Pennsylvania Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf



Conference Schedule

Saturday, November 2, 2019

 7:15am - 8:15am Breakfast

8:00am - 11:30am

ASL only

Presented by:

Kierstin Muroski

   Black and white head-shot of Kierstin Muroski smiling at the camera.


Self-Assessment: The Key to Improved interpretations

Self-assessment is a complex construct that requires a clear understanding of individual goals, a developed systematic approach, and a desire to improve in order to achieve success.  This workshop will present self-assessment techniques to assist with improving one's own interpretations. The workshop will involve active participation as we work through the steps of the self-assessment framework.  Participants must have a cell phone or another recording device that can be used to record themselves interpreting for approximately 5-10 minutes.  Participants' interpretations will not be shown to others unless they care to do so.

  1. Explain strategies to analyze interpretations.
  2. Discuss the role of self-analysis and the benefits of autonomous learning.
  3. Apply an alternative framework for self-assessing interpreting work.

    Prior Content Knowledge Level:  Little/none

    RID CEUs: 0.35 PS
    AOPC Credit: 
    must attend both a morning and afternoon session = 0.7 CEUs

    8:30am - 11:30am

    ASL only

    Presented by:

    Rebecca Nice

    White woman with blond hair wearing a black hat and sunglasses, smiling because she is on vacation.


    Ethics - who needs it?

    Ethics - who needs it? We All Do.  In this workshop, we will talk about why having a continuous discussion on Ethics and the daily dilemmas we face is crucial. We will learn how to have these discussions while maintaining the required confidentiality that our job demands. We will discuss hypothetical situations and work them through, beginning to end, considering all the parties that could be affected by our decisions. Feel free to bring your own dilemmas, as we will make time, in a safe space, to talk about them as well.  

    Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of the seminar, participants should be able to:

    1.  Explain why having good, strong ethics are so important to Interpreters
    2. Take an ethical dilemma and work it through, beginning to end, naming at least 3 entities that could be affected by an interpreter's decision.
    3. Name at least 2 ways in which you can discuss an ethical dilemma, while keeping pertinent information confidential

    Prior Content Knowledge Level:  Little/none

    RID CEUs: 0.3 PS
    AOPC Credit: must attend both a morning and afternoon session = 0.7 CEUs

    11:45am - 2:15pm

    ASL and English with interpretation

    Presented by:

    PARID Board


    PARID Annual Business Meeting
    Lunch Sponsored by ASL Services

    Come join us to review what the PARID Board has been doing for the past year. Make, discuss, and vote on motions submitted by PARID members – participate in PARID’s business.

    RID CEUs: 0.0
    AOPC Credit: 0.0

    2:30pm - 6:00pm

    ASL Only

    Presented by:

    Rebecca Nice

    White woman with blond hair wearing a black hat and sunglasses, smiling because she is on vacation.

    VRS and VRI - Differences, Similarities, Benefits and CHAlLENGES

    In this workshop, we will explore many different aspects of VRS and VRI Interpreting. We will talk about the challenges and benefits of the work for Interpreters. While there are many similarities between VRS work and VRI work, the differences in the work are important to understand and discuss. We will also focus some of our time on the impact, both negative and positive, that VRS and VRI have/could have on the Deaf community. The way we approach this work can drastically improve the Deaf community's experience with these services.

    Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of the seminar, participants should be able to:

    1. Describe three or more differences between VRS and VRI work
    2. List at least 2 ways interpreters can practice self-care while working in these settings
    3. Explain how an interpreter's approach can improve or negatively impact the Deaf community's experience using VRS and VRI

    Prior Content Knowledge Level:  Little/none

    RID CEUs: 0.35 PS
    AOPC Credit: 
    must attend both a morning and afternoon session = 0.7 CEUs

    2:30pm - 6:30pm

    ASL and English with Interpretation

    Presented by:

    Jessica Bentley-Sassaman

    Jessica Bentley-Sassaman is smiling with brown hair wearing a lavender colored shirt  and black suit jacket.


    Seminar Sponsored by:

    Deaf-Hearing
    Communication Centre

    bringing up the next generation of interpreters: mentoring approaches

    This seminar will focus on strategies for mentors who work with interpreting students during their practicum as well as novice interpreters. Then the training will be geared to skill development activities, the mentor-mentee relationship, setting goals, giving feedback, guiding mentees in self-analysis, and resources for mentees and mentors.

    Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of the seminar, participants should be able to:

    1. Identify where to locate resources to assist with the mentoring process and skill development activities
    2. Demonstrate techniques in guided self-analysis and providing feedback
    3. Demonstrate an awareness through discussion on the differences with mentoring students and novice interpreters.

    Prior Content Knowledge Level:  Some

    RID CEUs: 0.4 PS
    AOPC Credit: 
    must attend both a morning and afternoon session = 0.7 CEUs


    Sunday, November 3, 2019

     7:15am - 8:15amBreakfast Sponsored by Pennsylvania School for the Deaf

    8:00am - 12:00pm

    ASL only

    Presented by:

    Christ Rutledge and
    Alesia Allen

    Smiling white woman, with curly blonde hair, wearing a black blazer, and a green striped floral background.

    Head shot photo of a Black woman with black colored bobbed hairstyle. She is wearing brown colored glasses with gold trimmings on top of the glasses, smiling.


    Seminar Sponsored by:

    Deaf-Hearing
    Communication Centre

    System Disruption: Interpreting in OpPressive systems as an ally

    Power, privilege, and oppression are important topics in the field of interpreting. You may already have an understanding of individual power and privilege. This workshop takes a step back from the individual perspective and looks at these issues from a historical system perspective and how they impact interpreters and the field as a whole. Interpreters will learn how systems and system design can lead to oppression. This workshop will be examine systems on a micro level (individual) to macro level (government and society). Participants will identify and examine systems within the interpreting field and learn how to ask reflective questions that can bring about system disruption. This is an interactive workshop in which participants will apply and discuss the theories and application in their everyday work.

    Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of the seminar, participants should be able to:

    1. Explain how human systems (macro, meso, and micro) can be discriminatory and exclusive.
    2. Define systemic oppression as it relates to marginalized communities and intersectional identities.
    3. Discuss the historical and societal factors (racism, sexism, ableism, audism) that impact system design.
    4. Explain the impact of individual power and privilege.
    5. Identify the existing systems within the interpreting community and how they impact interpreting work.
    6. Examine how discriminatory systems impact an interpreter’s individual work.
    7. Develop one act of system disruption that participants can complete when they leave the conference.

    RID CEUs: 0.4 PS (PPO)
    AOPC Credit: 0.4 CEUs

    8:30am - 12:00pm

    English with ASL Interpretation

    Presented by:

    Lori Milcic

    Smiling white female with green eyes and dark blonde hair braided to the side. She is wearing glasses, dangling earrings with little trees on them, a beige top with a blue short sleeved cardigan and a necklace of brown beads with a gold colored Hobbit door pendant.

    Getting What you want

    As an interpreter, you have to get what you need in order to do your job effectively. How do you accomplish that goal when you are constantly thrown into novel situations with different people, all with their own agendas? Learn a simple tool to help you predict people's behavior and figure out how to get what you need without losing your cool. This tool can be applied to Deaf clients, hearing clients and your team interpreter. Heck, you can even apply it to your kids, boss or significant other!

    Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of the seminar, participants should be able to:

    1. Describe four general personality types of the DiSC profile
    2. Analyze other's underlying needs in the moment
    3. Develop practical applications in your own work setting
    Prior Content Knowledge Level: Little/none

    RID CEUs: 0.35 PS
    AOPC Credit: 0.4 CEUs


     

    Join the Conference Committee
    Send us an email letting us know what you would like to do.

    conference@parid.org

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     PA Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (PARID)  

    744 South Street #750    Philadelphia PA 19147


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